What is High-Risk Pregnancy?

A high risk pregnancy is one that requires specialized extra care from specially trained providers in order to have a healthy pregnancy and baby. It can threaten the life or health of the mother or her child. This is often arises, if you suffer from a chronic illness or have other factors and conditions that convert your pregnancy in the high risk category. Several other factors can make a pregnancy high risk, for example mother’s age and lifestyle, existing health conditions of the mother and some significant health issues that occurred before or during pregnancy. Some pregnancies become high risk as they grow, while for a variety of reasons, some women are at increased risk for risky pregnancy even before they get pregnant. It is likely that problems may prevail with both mother and the baby during the pregnancy, birth process or even after the delivery of the child. For both the mother and the baby, the problems can be minor or life threatening in severity, which require additional monitoring and care from your doctor. 

Risk factors for a high-risk pregnancy

Sometimes a high-risk pregnancy is the result of a medical condition present before pregnancy. Specific factors that might contribute to a high-risk pregnancy include:

Existing health conditions: For example high blood pressure, being HIV-positive or diabetes.

Obesity and overweight: Most people already familiar with the facts that obesity increases the risk for high blood pressure or gestational diabetes. Additionally it can also increase the risk of cesarean delivery, preeclampsia, stillbirth or neural tube defects. Researchers have suggested that obesity can raise infants’ risk of having heart problems at birth by 15%.

Multiple pregnancies: If a women carrying more than one fetus – twins or higher-order multiples, the risk of complications will be high as compared with single pregnancy. Common complications include preterm birth, premature labor and and preeclampsia. It is recorded that more than one-half of all twins and 93 percent of triplets are born at less than 37 weeks’ gestation.

Young or old age of mother: Pregnancy in teens and women with age more than 35 years older increases the risk for gestational high blood pressure or preeclampsia.

Medical history:  A history of diabetes, heart disorders, and chronic hypertension, breathing problems such as poorly controlled asthma, infections, and blood-clotting disorders such as deep vein thrombosis can considerably enhance pregnancy risks.

Poor lifestyle: Smoking cigarettes, taking illegal drugs and drinking alcohol can put a pregnancy at high risk.

Surgical history: A history of surgery on your uterus including, multiple abdominal surgeries, multiple C-sections or surgery for uterine tumors (fibroids) can increase chances for pregnancy risks.

Pregnancy complications: Various health complications that develop during pregnancy can also increase pose risks. For examples an abnormal placenta position, Rh (rhesus) sensitization and fetal growth less than the 10th percentile for gestational age.

Women with high-risk pregnancies should require extra care from a special team of health care providers to ensure the best possible pregnancy results. Some Important Tests before Planning a Pregnancy after Miscarriage

 

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